Flight of Colour

Flight of Colour


  • Author: Adrian Greaves
  • Publish Date: 01/01/2007

Review By : Anna Maplesden

Flight of Colour This is a novel by Adrian Greaves, best selling Zulu War author and editor of the Anglo Zulu War Historical Society Journals. Following a near fatal accident in 1985 while on Police duty, the author underwent numerous major spinal operations and spent many months in hospital; Flight of Colour was written during the following years of recuperation. It was first published in 1992 as a private publication and was followed by a limited editio, which quickly sold out. Following his subsequent retirement from the Police Service, success followed as an author. So many requests were received over the years for Flight of Colour to be re-issued that it has now been revised, updated and re published. The story is based on the experiences of the author’s ancestors who, in the early 1870s, sought to escape the poverty of life in England’s rural community for a new life farming in South Africa. From humble beginnings, the family prospered and, over the years, many of them were touched by the dramatic events that unfurled as South Africa developed. Some members of the family still live in South Africa while others have settled further afield in Australia and America, though their individual successes all directly hinge on their ancestors’ earlier experiences. Although based on family records and diaries, the account is nevertheless a story and must be read as such, though the significance of key characters and events will be easily recognised by living family members. The most frequently asked questions following the initial publication of Flight of Colour were limited to two, ‘what happened to the diamonds?’ and ‘what happened to the Colour? As the answers have no bearing on the story I can answer them both here and now; the diamonds were sold following the First World War and the Colour still exists – though it is now independently owned. As is to be expected from Adrian Greaves, the story line starts with the advent of the Anglo Zulu War of 1879. In keeping with that epic event, the story moves apace and weaves a strong human dimension into the account. The book’s excitement follows the dramatic events from the onset of war against the Zulus to the Boer War and then moves through the turmoil that accompanied South Africa’s independence to the present time. As before, cracking read that will appeal to anyone who enjoys a gripping story, it will especially appeal to devotees of the Anglo Zulu War

Friday 05th of May 2006 08:44:44 AM